The Viceregal Lion
  1. The Governor General of Canada
  2. Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette
Heraldry Today

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Frank Frederick Fagan

St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador
Grant of Arms and Supporters, with differences to Julie Alexis Drodge and Andrew William Fagan
April 15, 2015
Vol. VI, p. 497

Arms of Frank Frederick Fagan

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Blazon

Arms

Barry dancetty Argent and Azure a tree eradicated issuant from a rock Or;

Crest

Issuant from an ancient crown Or a raven rising Sable;

Supporters

Two lion-beavers Or and Azure each grasping a rod of Aesculapius Sable its serpent Or and standing on a rocky mount proper strewn with pitcher plants Or;

Motto

SEMPER SUMERE DIEM;


Symbolism

Arms

The white and blue pattern, resembling the snow-covered hills and ocean waves of Newfoundland, alludes to the sports of alpine skiing and sailing that Their Honours’ family enjoys. The rock symbolizes an ancient medium of communications alluding to His and Her Honour’s careers in telecom communication and education. The tree symbolizes His Honour’s family, with the three main branches in the crown of the tree symbolizing his daughter Julie, and two sons, Andrew and the late Richard Fagan. The spreading roots represent Their Honours’ large extended families who have deep roots throughout the province.

Crest

The raven symbolizes for Their Honours the spirit of a deceased skier, one who travelled fast and gracefully. The crown alludes to His Honour’s position as Lieutenant-Governor.

Supporters

The lion half relates to the lions in the provincial arms of Newfoundland and Labrador. The beaver half alludes to both sets of Their Honours’ parents who were hard-working, industrious builders of houses and who instilled strong values in their large families. The rods of Aesculapius allude to the medical profession of Their Honours’ two sons. The pitcher plant is the provincial flower, representing Their Honours’ activities throughout the province.

Motto

This Latin phrase means “Find time always”.